Emergency heart care

Staff using a defibrillator to restart a cardiac arrest patient's heart

There are two heart conditions that need immediate emergency care; a heart attack and a cardiac arrest. If a person suffering from one of these doesn’t get medical help quickly, they could die.

Heart attack

A heart attack happens when an artery becomes obstructed, restricting the flow of blood to the heart. The most common sign of a heart attack is chest pain, though there are other symptoms. Left untreated it can lead to a cardiac arrest, which is when the heart stops beating.

Cardiac arrest

A cardiac arrest occurs when the heart stops pumping blood around the body, and can be a result of heart attack, choking or trauma.

If someone is suffering from either of these conditions you need to call 999 for an ambulance immediately.

We have worked hard to raise awareness of the symptoms of cardiac arrest, and we provide basic life-support training courses.

As a result, the number of people surviving cardiac arrest has risen significantly over the past few years, but more can still be done.

Learn to recognise the symptoms of a heart attack or cardiac arrest and the action you can take, and you may be able to save someone's life.

Video: How to save a life with a defibrillator

‘Shockingly easy’, features Paramedic Karen Walling showing what to do if you see someone suffer a cardiac arrest, including how to shock their heart to get it started again.



We have prepared a text transcript for the video for site visitors who are visually or hearing impaired

Resuscitation training courses

Have you ever thought about learning how to save someone's life? Would you know what to do if someone suffered a cardiac arrest, heart attack or was choking?

We offer Heartstart training free of charge to voluntary/community groups and charities. We also provide emergency life-support training to organisations in the public and private sector at a cost.

Contact Us

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Video: Heart attack care

Mark Whitbread
 

Real life: Lee's story

Lee and the staff that saved his life